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July
25

What to Know When Buying a Historic Home

Historic Home

If you envision yourself owning a home that stands out from other properties or boasts design details that are rare in modern properties, a historic home is a terrific option to consider.

There are a few things our real estate agents want buyers to know when considering historic homes to help them confirm that the property is right for their lifestyle and property needs. Here's what you need to know. 

  • A Property Must Meet Certain Criteria to Receive a Historic Classification
    The historic home designation isn't arbitrarily used. Instead, the home must meet certain criteria to receive the historical classification. A home isn't a historic home just because it's old. To be called a historic home, the property must be a minimum of 50 years old. The overall structure must look the same as when the property was first constructed. It must also meet a qualification that proves the property is historically significant, like playing a role in a historical event, housing an important person or group, or using an architectural style that's historically significant. 
  • Historic Homes Often Experience Higher Than Average Appreciation
    When compared to other homes in the area, historic homes usually appreciate in value at faster rates than other properties. This increase is driven in part by the limited stock of historic homes. Historic homes aren't as widely available as other home types, and this limited supply helps support higher home prices. People who purchase historic homes tend to hold onto them for years, a fact that further drives steady increases in the value of historic homes. If your home is located in a historic district, this may further boost your home's appreciation. Historic districts contain multiple historic properties that create a neighborhood with properties that are required to maintain a certain standard of appearance. 

remodeling plans

  • Remodeling Plans Should Maintain the Home's Structural Integrity
    Any remodeling that you complete must support the home's original design and structure. In many towns, renovations to historic homes must be approved by a local review board. It's usually fine to repair or even replace materials that are original to the home when necessary, but these repairs must support the property's historical appearance and, whenever possible, use materials that are original to the home. While massive renovations inside a historic home usually aren't permitted, enlarging the home by building an addition may be permitted as long as the addition adheres to the home's architectural style. Any existing details in the original portion of the home should be reflected in the addition.

Financing Options

  • The Process of Acquiring Financing and Insurance for the Home is a Little Different
    Before you start looking at Rockingham County homes for sale, you'll want to obtain mortgage preapproval so you know how much you can borrow. However, you need to know that the process for acquiring financing for a historic home is a little different than securing financing for a traditional property. Some mortgage programs can't be used for historic homes that require a lot of repairs; the lender is likely going to want to know how you're going to pay for these repairs. There are programs available, including the Limited 203(K) loan and Title 1 Property Improvement Loan, that provide homeowners with affordable loans to repair their historic homes. You'll also want to shop around for your home insurance, as some home insurance companies may be reluctant to insure properties that they feel will be expensive to repair or replace. 

Tax Incentives

  • You May Qualify for Tax Incentives
    There are tax incentives available for homeowners who need to rehabilitate a historic property. The Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives Program is one tax credit you may qualify for; there are also tax deductions available if your property is eligible for a historic preservation easement. 
  • Properly Maintaining a Historic Home Requires More Resources Than the Average Home
    While historic homes have long lifespans thanks to their quality construction and durable materials, they do occasionally need maintenance. Maintenance for a historic home is usually a little more expensive and time-consuming than maintenance for a conventional property. Historic homes may require specialized materials and labor to ensure that the repairs are in line with the home's original design. 

Architecture

  • Historic Homes are Valued for Their Distinctive Details
    Historic homes contain details that are often only found in this type of property. Your windows or other details might not be perfectly centered, or your floors may creak and appear a bit uneven. These aren't issues that need to be fixed; instead, they should be viewed as details that are unique to a historic home's distinctive style and architecture. 

A historic home is a terrific option for anyone who wants to own a property that's a part of history and features a one-of-a-kind design. Ready to start the search for your historic home? Contact us today to get started!

June
13

Summer Learning: Augusta County Historical Places

Augusta County

Shhh! Don't tell the kids, but learning can be fun. Our real estate agents love to combine culture and entertainment at these impressive historical attractions near Augusta County homes for sale.

  • Frontier Culture Museum - 1290 Richmond Rd., Staunton, VA 24401
    How did the early immigrants blend their histories to create a new culture in the colonies? Learn about their fascinating stories at the Frontier Culture Museum. Permanent exhibits include replicas of West African, Irish, English, German, and Native American farms from the 1700s along with an 1820s American farmhouse and early American schoolhouse. The museum also hosts lectures, concerts, and special holiday events. Admission is $12 for adults, $11 for high school and college students, and $7 for ages 6-12. Hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily through December 1.

  • Bare House and Mill - 157 Wilda Rd., Stuarts Draft, VA 24477
    Bare House and Mill, situated on scenic fields not far from Stuarts Draft homes for sale, are both listed on the National Register of Historic Places. While the original home was destroyed by fire in the mid-1850s, it was soon replaced by a Greek Revival/Italianate two-story brick home that still stands. The mill, which was shut down after the 1870 floods, has been ravaged by time, although the limestone ruins hold evidence of a rare undershot wheel.

  • Valley Railroad Stone Bridge - Jolivue, VA 24401
    As air travel has taken over as the preferred method of transportation, structures such as the Valley Railroad Stone Bridge have become a rare sight. The four-arch bridge, which spans Folly Mills Creek, was constructed in 1884 as part of the Valley Railroad line connecting Staunton and Lexington. While the line was discontinued in 1942 and the tracks were subsequently removed, the stunning bridge has been maintained as a charming landmark for area travelers. The remarkable masonry engineering displayed by the bridge landed it on the National Register of Historic Places. 

  • The Stonewall Brigade Band - Gypsy Hill Park, 600 Churchville Ave., Staunton, VA 24401
    Art meets history with the Stonewall Brigade Band, the oldest continuous community band in the country. In 1855, the band started with all brass instruments as the Mountain Saxhorn Band. Since then, it's grown into a full band, adding woodwind and percussion instruments. The Stonewall Brigade Band performs free summer concerts at 8 p.m. each Monday night from June through August. Their Gypsy Hill Park bandstand, built expressly for the band, dates back to 1889.

  • R.R. Smith Center for History and Art - 20 S. New St., Staunton, VA 24401
    Local culture is showcased at the R.R. Smith Center for History and Art, housed in an 1894 hotel in Staunton's Beverley Historic District. The building is home to the Staunton Augusta Art Center, with exhibits that change every six weeks, and the Augusta County Historical Society, which holds archives that can be used for ancestral research. Be sure to stroll the adjacent Mevluda Tahirovic Memorial Garden, a lovely tribute to the donor's late fiancée. Gallery hours are 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday. Admission is free.

  • Harnsberger Octagonal Barn - Weyers Cave, VA 24486
    Built around 1867, the Harnsberger Octagonal Barn is a significant departure from the classic red-sided rectangular barns. The unusual design was influenced by architectural theories that were in fashion after the Civil War. Local carpenter William Evers supervised construction, and the barn is still in use, not far from Weyers Cave homes for sale.

  • Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum - 20 N. Coalter St., Staunton, VA 24401
    As the 28th President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson helped lead our country during the early years of the 20th century. Today, the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum is located in the city of his birth, right down the street from Staunton homes for sale. Tour his family home, and explore seven galleries featuring artifacts from Wilson's life and times. Admission is $15 for adults and $8 for ages 6-17. Hours are 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily except Sunday when doors open at noon.

Summer is a perfect time to buy or sell your Augusta County home. Contact us at Old Dominion Realty to get started.

May
25

Take a Walking Tour of New Market, VA

New Market

New Market is one of the most historic communities in the Shenandoah Valley, and much of that fascinating history has been preserved to the present day. With many parks, performance venues, businesses, and dining destinations, there's so much to see in this Virginia community. Our real estate agents have the details on some of the spots that you won't want to miss on your walking tour of New Market.

  • New Market Community Park – 9670 Cadet Rd., New Market, VA 22844
    With a convenient location close to New Market homes for sale and tons of activities for family members of all ages to enjoy, New Market Community Park is sure to be a fun stop on your walking tour. The park features three playgrounds for kids, athletic fields for enjoying all of your favorite sports, and picnic shelters that provide a scenic setting to stop for lunch during your tour. It's also home to the New Market Community Pool, the perfect place to cool off during a busy summer day of exploration.

  • Virginia Museum of the Civil War – 8895 George R Collins Pkwy., New Market, VA 22844
    History buffs will also enjoy a visit to the fascinating Virginia Museum of the Civil War, which features exhibits on the Battle of New Market and a wide variety of other battles and historic events throughout Virginia. The museum itself is a National Historic Landmark, and it's the only Civil War museum owned by the state of Virginia. While you're there, stop by the museum's theater to view the award-winning film "Field of Lost Shoes," which is shown every day.

  • Southern Kitchen Restaurant – 9576 US-11, New Market, VA 22844
    For the classic New Market dining experience, make a stop at the Southern Kitchen Restaurant during your tour. This local landmark was established in 1956 and has been a community gathering place ever since. The menu features all of your favorite diner fare, including some of the best-fried chicken you'll find anywhere in Virginia.

  • Shenandoah River North Fork – New Market, VA 22844
    A stroll along the waterfront is sure to be an enjoyable part of any walking tour, and the North Fork of the Shenandoah River runs along the northwestern edge of New Market. While you're walking along the river, you may find people kayaking, canoeing, fishing, or going for a swim in the water.

  • Endless Caverns – 1800 Endless Caverns Rd., New Market, VA 22844
    Bring your walking tour underground when you visit the Endless Caverns, which were first discovered in the 1800s. Ever since the caverns were discovered, they've provided endless entertainment for residents who love to explore nature. Enjoy a guided tour with a local expert, and discover the gifts of nature that are waiting for you below the surface.

  • Rouss Center for the Arts – 9357 N Congress St., New Market, VA 22844
    New Market has a long history of showcasing performance arts, and the Rouss Center of the Arts carries on that tradition to the present day. This performance venue is dedicated to showcasing the best Virginia artists in its gallery with rotating exhibitions and offering a busy schedule of live plays, musicals, and other performances. Stop by the art gallery any time to see some fantastic work from local artists.

  • New Market Farmers Market – S. Congress St. Public Parking Lot, New Market, VA 22844
    Fresh food and friendly faces will always be waiting for you at the New Market Farmers Market, which happens every Friday evening. Pick up some fresh, local ingredients for creating a delicious meal after your walking tour, and discover hand-crafted items from local artisans.

Ready to write the next chapter of your family's own history in New Market? Our team is here to help you find the perfect home. Contact us to buy and sell homes throughout the New Market, VA area.

April
12

Staunton Victorian Architecture Tour

Staunton Architecture

Nestled in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley, Staunton, Virginia, is a beautiful city with a rich history that goes back at least as far as the history of the United States itself. Our real estate agents are lucky to live in a place with such an amazing variety of historic homes. 

Staunton was originally settled as a frontier outpost in the 1730s and was incorporated in 1801. But Staunton really boomed from the years surrounding the Civil War until the 1920s, and it's from this period—roughly coinciding with the Victorian era—that many of the city's most spectacular historic buildings date. 

At present, 33 structures and districts in Staunton are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. If you happen to be interested in historic Staunton homes for sale, read on to learn more about the Victorian homes and buildings that make up Staunton's vibrant historic districts. 

Beverly Street

Beverly Street runs right through the historic heart of Downtown Staunton and is home to some of the city's most striking Victorian architecture. A prime example is the Marquis Building, a handsome brick building with numerous balconies and a dramatic turret, designed in 1899 by the renowned architect T.J. Collins. 

Other unique Victorian-era structures in the Beverly Street Historic District include the Queen Anne Clock Tower, the Hoover House Hotel, and the Putnam Organ Works Store. This was a part of town that began to expand rapidly in the years following the railroad's arrival in Staunton in 1852. No Victorian tour of Staunton is complete without a stroll through the Beverly Street Historic District.

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Newtown

Staunton's oldest residential district, the area known as Newtown, was deeded to the city in 1878. There are buildings in this district dating to practically period in the city's history, including several noteworthy Victorian structures like the Cochran House and the Robertson House. One of the oldest structures in the district is the Stuart House, which dates to 1791. 

Another important structure is the Stonewall Jackson Building, built in 1887 and served as Staunton's first public school. Its architecture blends elements of the Victorian and Colonial Revival styles. As you walk through the neighborhood, keep a lookout for the numerous Victorian-era family homes that line Madison Place and South Fayette Street as well. 

Stuart Addition

The historic district known as the Stuart Addition was originally deeded to the city of Staunton in 1803. Like much of the city, this neighborhood experienced its greatest period of growth, beginning in the 1870s when Victorian, Queen Anne, and Georgian Revival styles or architecture were prevalent. The C.W. Miller House, built in 1899 on the campus of Mary Baldwin University, is one of the most prominent structures in the district. 

Another important building to note as you explore the Stuart Addition is St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church. Designed by prominent architect T. J. Collins, the church was built in 1895 and is a striking display of dramatic Victorian Gothic architecture. 

Gospel Hill

One of Staunton's oldest and most varied residential districts, Gospel Hill includes numerous homes built between 1840 to 1930 and which range in size from bungalows to mansions. Notable Victorian buildings include the Arista Hoge House, the Catlett House, and two homes are known simply as Oakdene and The Oaks. Each of them is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Of course, arguably the most well-known house in the Gospel Hill Historic District is the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace, a stately brick home that was built in 1846 and in which the future president was born 10 years later. Although the house was build during the Victorian era, its architecture would be more accurately described as Colonial Revival. 

Wharf Area

An amazingly well preserved commercial district dating back to the mid-19th century, the Wharf Area represents the heart of Staunton's boom years. Featuring rows of warehouses, commercial buildings, and storefronts, the district is mostly filled with picturesque brick buildings. These structures sprung up during the period of growth that happened in Staunton following the Civil War, replacing the wood buildings that formerly dominated the area. 

The Railroad Water Tower, American Hotel, and John Burns Building are among the notable structures still present in the Wharf Area, all dating from the mid to late 19th century, when the area was packed with businesses like distilleries, liveries, saloons, and merchants of all kinds. The former Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Station, built in 1902, is another hidden gem in the Wharf Area Historic District. 

Contact us today to learn more about life in Staunton, VA. It's a city with a rich history and a bright future, and our real estate agents are excited to help you find your dream home in the Staunton area. 

April
5

Why Harrisonburg is Called the Friendly City

Harrisonburg Friendly City

Harrisonburg is known as many things, from the county seat of Rockingham County to the first city in Virginia to be home to its own culinary district. But residents and visitors alike refer to Harrisonburg by a nickname that has stuck with the city for centuries – the Friendly City. Harrisonburg is the 12th largest city in Virginia, known for the warm, welcoming nature of its diverse residents, as well as its mix of urban amenities and small-town feel. Wondering why Harrisonburg is known as the Friendly City? Our real estate agents have the details on the friendly atmosphere you can expect in Harrisonburg and the reasons why you'll love calling the city home.

Why Harrisonburg Is Called the Friendly City

  • A City That Began with a Gift
    Harrisonburg is a warm, welcoming city, which was founded when Thomas Harrison, the son of two early immigrants to the area, gifted 2.5 acres of land to the newly formed Rockingham County in 1779. That land would eventually become home to the first courthouse in the county, and the land is still known as Court Square today. One year later, Harrison gifted another 50 acres of land to the county, and the city of Harrisonburg was born. The city was named for Thomas Harrison, and from those humble beginnings, it has grown into the vibrant city that so many residents love today.
  • The Harrisonburg Downtown Renaissance
    Anyone shopping for Harrisonburg homes for sale will definitely want to visit the city's downtown area, where you can find many examples of why Harrisonburg is known as the Friendly City. Downtown Harrisonburg is where you'll find many of the historic businesses that make the community such a welcoming place, along with examples of the diversity that has helped shape the city to this day. In 2004, Harrisonburg established the "Downtown Renaissance" program to create a vibrant new downtown area where residents could find food, fun, shopping, and relaxation. The program has been a major success, with many new businesses arriving to make their mark on the Friendly City.

  • A Culinary District Where Food and Friends Mingle
    Downtown is also home to Harrisonburg's Culinary District, the first of its kind in Virginia and an example that many other cities have since followed. The diversity of Harrisonburg's residents is reflected by the wide variety of different types of food that you can find in the Culinary District. Whether you're gathering at a rooftop restaurant at sunset for dinner, a patio on a sunny afternoon for lunch, or grabbing a seat at the taproom of your favorite craft brewery, you're sure to find new friends and fantastic food whenever you visit the Culinary District.

  • Why Students Can Find Fun and a Great Education in Harrisonburg
    The friendliness of Harrisonburg extends to residents of all ages, as college students at local universities can surely attest. Harrisonburg is home to both James Madison University and the Eastern Mennonite University. Both universities add to the culture of life in the city, and many students who come from out of town go on to become lifelong residents of Harrisonburg. Residents of Harrisonburg also enjoy going to sporting events at both universities while celebrating the championships in basketball, lacrosse, field hockey, and football that teams from the universities have won in recent years.
  • Outdoor Fun Is Always on the Menu in Harrisonburg
    City parks are natural places for people to gather for some local fun, and like many cities where you can shop for Virginia homes for sale, Harrisonburg is home to a robust park system that offers a wide variety of outdoor activities. During the summer, you might find an outdoor concert or city festival where you can meet new people in a fun, inviting setting. These parks are also home to sports leagues throughout the year for kids and adults – another way that Harrisonburg brings people together.

  • Support Your Friends By Shopping Local
    If you love shopping for art created by local artists and supporting local artisans who create unique items by hand, then you're sure to enjoy spending weekend mornings shopping at the many local businesses that make Harrisonburg such a unique place to call home. From handcrafted clothing, home goods, and fashion accessories to art galleries that showcase the amazing talents of city residents, Harrisonburg has it all. And if you've been searching for a city where you can create your own dream small business, then you'll be sure to love the welcome that you receive from Harrisonburg's residents and the small business community.

Searching for your next home in a city that's as fun as it is friendly? Let our experienced, local real estate team help. Contact us to buy and sell homes throughout the Harrisonburg, VA area.

March
22

Your Guide to Historic Augusta

Historic AugustaDid you know that the borders of Augusta County once stretched all the way to the Mississippi River? The county was established in 1738 and has played an important role in American history ever since. While the size of the county is slightly smaller than it was back in those days, today's Augusta County remains one of the most historic places in Virginia. You can still visit many historic destinations and see how the county has evolved in its nearly 300 years of existence. Our REALTORS® are here to help you discover the unique history of the region with our guide to historic Augusta County.

Your Guide to Historic Augusta

The Earliest Days of Augusta County
When Augusta County was founded in 1738, settlers from Europe were just beginning to push into the Shenandoah Valley and beyond. The territory included land that would eventually be carved into seven states. So while the border of the county really did include lands up to the Mississippi River, most of those lands hadn't been settled or explored. Still, Augusta County represented the frontier at the time, attracting a wide range of settlers and some notable names who would eventually write their names in the history books. Eventually, as more counties were established in the region in 1790, Augusta County was reduced to its current size – which still makes it the second-largest county in Virginia.

Augusta County Historical Society – 20 S New St., Staunton, VA 24401
There's no better place to discover the history of the region than the Augusta County Historical Society, which can be found in downtown Staunton at the R.R. Smith Center for History and Art. The dedicated volunteers at the Augusta County Historical Society work hard to record, preserve, and present local history for anyone who's interested in learning about the area. When you visit, you can find information on historic buildings, forgotten communities from Augusta's earliest days, and the many historic figures with ties to the area. Because Augusta County was so large when it was first founded, the Augusta County Historical Society also has early records from other Shenandoah Valley communities, which would eventually become part of other nearby counties in Virginia.

Discover Augusta County History through the Words of Those Who Created It
Among the many archives at the Augusta County Historical Society, you will find a vast collection of letters, journal entries, and personal writings from throughout the area's history. If your family has deep roots in the area, you may even find writings from your own ancestors! All of these writings provide a unique view of local history, recorded by the people who shaped it. Find out what it was like to live here when Augusta County was on the frontier, and see how the area developed over time into the place that we all love so much today.

Enjoy a Driving Tour of Historic Augusta County
The history of Augusta County can be discovered in many towns throughout the area, and the Augusta County Historic Society has created a self-guided driving tour of Augusta County to help you explore some of the county's most prominent historic sites. It's a great way to learn about the history and see some unique Virginia homes for sale along the way. As you travel, you'll have the chance to see historic churches, schools, cemeteries, businesses, homes, and much more. Download the guide to the driving tour to learn more about each historic site as you pass. And local history doesn't end in Augusta County! As you head north and pass beautiful Bridgewater homes for sale, you'll soon find yourself in historic Harrisonburg, where you can learn even more about Virginia's history.

Ready to find a home that allows you to discover the fascinating history of Augusta County first-hand and write your own name in the local history books? Our team is here to help you find a home you'll love, but making history is up to you. Contact us to buy and sell homes throughout the Augusta County, VA area

January
25

Explore Historic Downtown Harrisonburg With This Guide

Historic Harrisonburg

If Harrisonburg is the heart of the Shenandoah Valley, then downtown is its soul. The vibrant 40-block area is packed with shops, restaurants, and cultural attractions that embody the city's past and present. Take in the delights of historic downtown Harrisonburg with a visit to these great places recommended by our real estate agents.

  • Harrisonburg Farmers Market - 228 S. Liberty St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
    Did you know that farming is the largest private industry in Virginia? Enjoy the bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables at the Harrisonburg Farmers Market. This local favorite began more than 50 years ago as a modest stand in the parking lot of the Harrisonburg Police Station. Today the pet-friendly market is housed in the beautiful Turner Pavilion. Order online for convenient pickup. 

  • Ten Thousand Villages - 181 S. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
    Harrisonburg tradition meets global flair at Ten Thousand Villages, a delightful fair-trade gift shop in the heart of downtown. You'll find unique artisan-crafted home accessories, gourmet food products, jewelry, and gift items sourced from nearly 40 countries around the world. The non-profit business helps provide vital income for a wide network of artists. Hours are 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon - 4 p.m. Sunday.

  • Virginia Quilt Museum - 301 S. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
    The picturesque Virginia Quilt Museum offers a double-sided look at Harrisonburg history. Exhibits such as "HERstory" and "What's in a Word?" examine the rich tradition of quilting arts in Virginia and how they are intertwined with the overall culture. In addition, the museum is located in the Warren Sipe House, an elegant Greek Revival-style building dating back to 1856. Beginning February 16, the museum will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

    • Explore More Discovery Museum - 150 S. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
      At Explore More Discovery Museum, learning is disguised as fun for a day that's both entertaining and educational. Exhibits such as Friendly City Medical Center, TV Studio, and Art Smart help kids develop creative and practical skills while learning more about the world around them. Take the museum experience home with Discovery Kits To Go. Admission is $7.50 per person and free for members. Visits are by reservation only from 9:30 a.m. - noon and 1:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

    • Union Station Restaurant & Bar - 128 W. Market St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
      Union Station Restaurant & Bar
      , located in the former Wetsel Seed Building, takes its name from the railroad depot that once stood on its south side. Each booth includes photos and literature that serve as a tribute to a specific building that once stood or still stands in downtown Harrisonburg. Immerse yourself in local history while dining on baked crab dip, brisket sandwiches, and other elevated bar fare. Pick up a carryout order after a day viewing Harrisonburg homes for sale. Union Station is open 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

    • Hardesty-Higgins House - 212 S. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA 22801
      Now serving as downtown's visitor center, Hardesty-Higgins House bears the name of two former residents who had significant roles in Harrisonburg history. Henry Higgins, a physician who was active in local businesses and organizations, originally built the house. It was later occupied by Isaac Hardesty, the first mayor of Harrisonburg. Hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday.
    • Brothers Craft Brewing - 800 N. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA 22802
      While Brothers Craft Brewing was founded by three actual siblings, the Shifletts consider the entire community to be their extended family. The brothers renovated a soda bottling plant to realize their dream of bringing top-quality craft beer to the area around Rockingham County homes for sale. Between the year-round flagship offerings, seasonal flavors, and creative one-off styles, there's always something new to try. Orders can be placed for curbside pickup or local delivery. The taproom is open 1 p.m. - 10 p.m. weekdays, noon - 10 p.m. Saturday, and noon - 8 p.m. Sunday.

    Looking for experienced assistance with Virginia homes for sale? Whether you're buying or selling, we can help you achieve your goal. Contact us at Old Dominion Realty to learn more.

    August
    30

    Homes in the Shenandoah Valley

    With rich history and lush surroundings, the architecture of Virginia features beautiful, robust styles with enough variety to please any homeowner. When perusing the many housing styles in the Shenandoah Valley, you can find centuries-old historic homes, contemporary homes with mid-century design influences, and everything in between.

    Explore the architecture of our area with these housing styles in the Shenandoah Valley.

    Colonial

    The austere but decorated styling of colonial homes features elements from old English home architecture. In either antique or new homes with colonial design, expect beautiful chimneys, darling wood frame exteriors, and classic floor plans.

    Federal

    This pre-revolutionary style draws inspiration from classical architecture from England, France, and Germany. Popularized in the 1700s and 1800s and continually one of the most beloved of the housing styles in the Shenandoah Valley, the Federal style features Greco-Roman elements like columns and arched windows. Enjoy a stately and timeless beauty in Federal homes.

    Victorian

    Victorian architecture takes its name from Queen Victoria, who ruled over England when this highly decorative style became popular. Still one of the most popular home styles in the South and throughout the country, Victorian homes feature classic floor plans and details inside, and flowingly ornate designs on the exterior. Elegant bay windows and handsome porches are common features of Victorian homes.

    Farm House

    Among the truly local design styles, the farm house has a treasured place in our area's architectural history. All housing styles in the Shenandoah Valley work naturally with the surrounding landscape, but the classic farm house looks especially perfect around here. Look for both historic working farm houses and new homes inspired by the design, with large faces and windows. These can vary from a traditional log cabin style to the very Southern hall and parlor design.

    Contemporary

    Modern homes in our area range from striking mid-century designs to the contemporary brick and stone homes popular among families across the country. Explore modernist designs to see how elements of classic architecture and fashion-forward artistry can combine to craft a home with form and function. Many subdivisions also feature the exciting contemporary trends and community design sought after by families today.

    The Experts at Old Dominion Realty are accustomed to matching buyers with an architectural style that meets all their expectations.  Contact one of them to find your ideal home in the Shenandoah Valley.

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